m(other)

Ask    Submit   parenting off the beaten path

nichelavideoart:

Cennetoğlu and Özcan collaborate with a new-age healer
Rodeo Gallery on Sıraselviler Street off İstanbul’s Taksim Square presents the collaboration of acclaimed artists Banu Cennetoğlu and Yasemin Özcan.


Cennetoğlu is known for her interest in printing material and the İstanbul Art Research Association (BAS), an open archive project she initiated, that collects and features artist publications from all around the world.
“What is it that you are worried about?” is a project in which the two artists have combined their power into a multi-layered, interdisciplinary video work and a printed material accompanying it.

nichelavideoart:

Cennetoğlu and Özcan collaborate with a new-age healer

Rodeo Gallery on Sıraselviler Street off İstanbul’s Taksim Square presents the collaboration of acclaimed artists Banu Cennetoğlu and Yasemin Özcan.

Cennetoğlu is known for her interest in printing material and the İstanbul Art Research Association (BAS), an open archive project she initiated, that collects and features artist publications from all around the world.

“What is it that you are worried about?” is a project in which the two artists have combined their power into a multi-layered, interdisciplinary video work and a printed material accompanying it.

— 2 days ago with 1 note
mothernaturenetwork:

30 insane facts about sleepDo you know what temperature your room should be for a good night’s sleep? Find out the answer to this and more in this fact-filled infographic on sleep.

mothernaturenetwork:

30 insane facts about sleep
Do you know what temperature your room should be for a good night’s sleep? Find out the answer to this and more in this fact-filled infographic on sleep.

— 4 days ago with 252 notes

washingtonpost:

silentgiantla:

Animated artwork by Rebecca Mock

Fine, detailed and subtle animated artwork created by New York illustrator Rebecca Mock. Apparently the animated gif back to stay, gradually more and more people are exploring this old format and customers asking for shouting. Several of these illustrations were created for the New York Times or The Warlus magazine.

(via velvetblory)

— 4 days ago with 104902 notes
"Any time you talk to anyone about something that they love, they’re, like, their most beautiful. It’s a cool gift to get to talk to people about what they love."
Amy Poehler  (via littlelottechristina)

(Source: psych-facts, via quartey)

— 5 days ago with 37355 notes
hifructosemag:

red-lipstick:

Jules de Balincourt (b. 1972, Paris, France, New York based) - Blind Faith And Tunnel Vision, 2005     Paintings: Oil, Enamel on Board


Look out!

hifructosemag:

red-lipstick:

Jules de Balincourt (b. 1972, Paris, France, New York based) - Blind Faith And Tunnel Vision, 2005     Paintings: Oil, Enamel on Board

Look out!

(Source: julesdebalincourt.com)

— 5 days ago with 1185 notes
nichelavideoart:

Images Festival brings compelling experimental film and video to Toronto
Offerings are often political, critical and socially conscious. This year features a look at digital sweatshops, cargo ships in the Middle East, even the proliferation of techno gadgets.

For close to three decades, Toronto’s Images Festival, which opens Thursday and runs till April 19, has worked at the bleeding edge of experimental film and video with a mind to bringing the most compelling of it home to show the rest of us each year.


Mainstream it’s not and that’s the point: much of Images’ content each year delves unapologetically into fraught realms, both topical and visual. Work is often political, critical, socially conscious and, more often than not, an unabashed visual challenge to the status quo. Someone’s got to do it. We’re lucky that someone is right here in our hometown. Following: a handful of standouts from this year’s selection.

nichelavideoart:

Images Festival brings compelling experimental film and video to Toronto

Offerings are often political, critical and socially conscious. This year features a look at digital sweatshops, cargo ships in the Middle East, even the proliferation of techno gadgets.

For close to three decades, Toronto’s Images Festival, which opens Thursday and runs till April 19, has worked at the bleeding edge of experimental film and video with a mind to bringing the most compelling of it home to show the rest of us each year.

Mainstream it’s not and that’s the point: much of Images’ content each year delves unapologetically into fraught realms, both topical and visual. Work is often political, critical, socially conscious and, more often than not, an unabashed visual challenge to the status quo. Someone’s got to do it. We’re lucky that someone is right here in our hometown. Following: a handful of standouts from this year’s selection.

— 5 days ago with 4 notes
theparisreview:

“I had scarcely begun when I realized that what I had here at the very least was the Great American Novel. I sent off the first 150 pages to [agent Bernice Baumgarten] and hung around the post office for the next two weeks. At last an answer came. It read as follows: ‘Dear Peter, James Fenimore Cooper wrote this 150 years ago, only he wrote it better, Yours, Bernice.’ On a later occasion, when as a courtesy I sent her the commission on a short story sold in England, she responded unforgettably: ‘Dear Peter, I’m awfully glad you were able to get rid of this story in Europe, as I don’t think we’d have had much luck with it here. Yours, Bernice.’ Both these communications, quoted in their entirety, are burned into my brain forever—doubtless a salutary experience for a brash young writer. I never heard an encouraging word until the day Bernice retired, when she called me in and barked like a Zen master, ‘I’ve been tough on you because you’re very, very good.’ I wanted to sink down and embrace her knees.”
Peter Matthiessen, on his first novel.

theparisreview:

“I had scarcely begun when I realized that what I had here at the very least was the Great American Novel. I sent off the first 150 pages to [agent Bernice Baumgarten] and hung around the post office for the next two weeks. At last an answer came. It read as follows: ‘Dear Peter, James Fenimore Cooper wrote this 150 years ago, only he wrote it better, Yours, Bernice.’ On a later occasion, when as a courtesy I sent her the commission on a short story sold in England, she responded unforgettably: ‘Dear Peter, I’m awfully glad you were able to get rid of this story in Europe, as I don’t think we’d have had much luck with it here. Yours, Bernice.’ Both these communications, quoted in their entirety, are burned into my brain forever—doubtless a salutary experience for a brash young writer. I never heard an encouraging word until the day Bernice retired, when she called me in and barked like a Zen master, ‘I’ve been tough on you because you’re very, very good.’ I wanted to sink down and embrace her knees.”

Peter Matthiessen, on his first novel.

— 1 week ago with 247 notes
guernicamag:

Image by Alex Gibbs, I Know Nothing of the Illnesses I Will One Day Have, 2012. Courtesy the artist.
The Taiwanese novelist Qiu Miaojin committed suicide at twenty-six, leaving behind this story of a passionate relationship between two young women, told through a series of letters.
Last Words from Montmartre by Qiu Miaojin, translated from the Chinese by Ari Larissa Heinrich - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

guernicamag:

Image by Alex Gibbs, I Know Nothing of the Illnesses I Will One Day Have, 2012. Courtesy the artist.

The Taiwanese novelist Qiu Miaojin committed suicide at twenty-six, leaving behind this story of a passionate relationship between two young women, told through a series of letters.

Last Words from Montmartre by Qiu Miaojin, translated from the Chinese by Ari Larissa Heinrich - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

— 1 week ago with 24 notes